Times You’re Waiting For

By | Emotional Intelligence, Blog, Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Marketing for Peace Builders, New Posts, Opinions, Organizational Development, Persuasion, Relationships, Selling for Peace Builders, Social, Social Communication, Social Media, Storytelling, Strategies, Strategy, Truth

The times that you wait to take a risk.

The times that you wait to apply an innovation.

The times when you wait for reassurance.

The times you wait for enough external motivation.

The times you are looking for permission to act.

The times you are waiting for “everything” to be “just right.”

Those are the times that never come.

The times you take the risk, despite not knowing how it will turn out in the end.

The times that you apply the insight from the innovation.

The times that you don’t wait for reassurance.

The times you don’t need any more motivation.

The times when you don’t need permission. You just act.

The times when “everything” is not “just right;” in fact, “everything” is “mostly wrong.”

Those are the times that are always here.

They surround you all the time.

If you’re waiting for stability, safety, surety, and certainty, those times are rare. And they don’t come unless you act—actively—to do.

Now.

Otherwise, the times that you’re waiting on are assured to never arrive.

 

Unremarkable

By | Active Listening, Advice, Blog, Dysfunction, Education, Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Marketing for Peace Builders, New Posts, Old Posts, Persuasion, Presentations, Problem Solving, Selling for Peace Builders, Social, Social Communication, Social Media, Storytelling, Strategies, Strategy

The problem with many (if not most) people, processes, services, and products is that they are unremarkable.

This is not to say that they are unreliable, undesirable, or unmistakable.

There are people, processes, services, and products that fill niches that are banal, boring, and seemingly unnecessary.

They aren’t worth talking about, thinking about, or even spending a lot of cognitive effort in justifying.

The problem of unremarkability is compounded by the fact that the organizations developing and promoting these products, services, processes, and people, is that the solution to their unremarkability is thought to be a lack of attention and awareness.

That’s not the problem.

Not even close.

Buying more followers, increasing social proof, becoming more likeable; these are long-term processes, that cannot be successfully applied to the banal, the boring, or the seemingly unnecessary.

Here’s a tip, for winning the long game.

Instead of trying to figure out how to scale unremarkability with money, time, or other resources, figure out how to scale the number of activities (i.e. process, services, products, etc.) that are actually remarkable.

Drivers Aren’t In Charge

By | Emotional Intelligence, Blog, Entrepreneurship, Marketing for Peace Builders, New Posts, Selling for Peace Builders

The same drivers that attracted you to entrepreneurship, to taking a risk, to leaping, to shipping; those same drivers may lead you to failure, loneliness, and perhaps even brokenness.

But you’re in charge of where the drivers go.

The drivers aren’t in charge of where you go.

Sometimes, the process of getting to your goal matters less than what your motivations for attaining the goal are.

Look closely at why you’re doing…

Outcomes You’ll Pay For

By | Advice, Blog, Culture, Divorce, Dysfunction, Education, Entrepreneurship, Leadership, New Posts, Old Posts, Opinions, Platform Building, Selling for Peace Builders, Storytelling, Strategies, Strategy

Outcomes of processes are the only things worth paying for.

No matter what your role at work, you are paid for producing outcomes from processes. The people who get paid the most, produce the highest value outcomes. The people who get paid the least, produce the least valuable outcomes.

Producing outcomes is also valued—and thus rewarded—in ways that have nothing to do with money: Prestige, status, attention, awareness, these are all rewards that are tied to specifically produced outcomes that an audience, and organization, or an individual, value.

The most excellent move that a person who is a freelancer, a consultant, or an entrepreneur can make, is to raise the price of an outcome to reflect continued, growing value. Not because it costs them more to generate that outcome—in actuality, the production costs are sunk and meaningless after a certain point—but because the value of that outcome becomes more desirable to the market that individual provider serves.

We attach all kinds of subjective meaning to outcomes and since they are really the only things that we value, failure and success, while remaining subjective, become more and more acute and infinite. But only if the person or organization producing the valuable outcome is willing to let go of their attachment to the success or failure of a particular outcome.

Thomas Edison and Michael Jordan both “got” this distinction. But if you’re still wrapped up in the mindset of a particular granular success or failure outcome, then you’ve missed that larger lesson.

There are three big tips to come out of this line of thinking that will serve anybody well as they move forward:

  • Outcomes are the only things worth paying for, but sometimes an innovator can be too far ahead of the market (thus, the innovator designation) or a crackpot can be too far behind the market (thus, the crackpot designation). Each person has to decide where they want to be in relation to the market and what the process is to get to the outcome that they are seeking to make valuable.
  • Outcomes have nothing to do with comparison, and have everything to do with personal satisfaction. One of the larger problems with the social media landscape is that people display as if the outcome of a process is the only thing that can connect themselves with an audience. But showing the audience the process, slowly revealing why the outcome has occurred, is an outcome in and of itself. And worth rewarding, not with comparison, but with massive differentiation. Each person has to decide their comfort level with the slow burn of a long-desired reveal.
  • Outcomes can be argued and debated, but in the end, when it comes time to render payment, they cannot be denied. This is evident most baldly in the world of sports, where the distance between a process and an outcome is perceived as being immediate (though there is usually years of preparation, sacrifice, humility, and ambition behind any outcome), and is less evident in the world of teaching, or parenting. These are places where twelve to twenty years of a process leads to outcomes that cannot be denied. Each person has to decide their own pace at which they would like to move toward a reward.

Focus on the process, highly value the outcome, and price the outcome against the market accordingly.

[Podcast] Earbud_U, Season Six, Episode # 2 – Eric Goldman

By | Emotional Intelligence, Active Listening, Arbitration, Blog, Earbud_U Podcast, Earbud_U!, Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Mediation, Negotiation, New Earbud_U Episodes, New Posts, Opinions, Organizational Development, Peacemaker, Podcast Archives, Podcast Episode, Reconciliation, Relationships, Selling for Peace Builders, Storytelling, Workplace, Workplace Development

Earbud_U, Season Six, Episode # 2 – Eric Goldman, Entertainment Lawyer, Mediator, Entrepreneur, Shaman, Profit-Leader-Coach

[Podcast] Earbud_U, Season Six, Episode #2 - Eric Goldman

Side hustles.

Uber drivers.

Amazon arbitrage.

Freelance income.

Consulting.

Speaking gigs.

Selling apps.

Drone rides.

There are more and more and more ways for your employees to work “on the side” than ever before. And as these pockets of work become more and more profitable, you as an employer will have to negotiate, not against an employee’s behavior in the workplace (although that will still happen) but against an employee’s side work.

Which is why what our guest today, Eric Goldman, is going to talk about makes so much sense.

But he isn’t the first to note the trendlines, and he won’t be the last.

The fact is, it’s never been easier for your employees to have choices about how and where to collect extra income, that you as an employer may not be aware of.

If this type of behavior—which is reflective of overall shifts in consumer behavior—doesn’t scare you (or at least get you to pay attention) into beginning to shift how you address employee concerns and balance profits, then I don’t know what will.

As usual, connect with Eric Goldman in all the ways that you can by clicking on the links below:

Eric Goldman – Profit Leader Coach: http://www.profitleadercoach.com/

Eric Goldman: http://www.esgesq.com/

Eric Goldman on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eric.goldman.986

Eric Goldman on Twitter: https://twitter.com/EricGoldmanEsq

Eric Goldman on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ericsgoldmanllc/

Empathy in Your Peacebuilding Marketing

By | Emotional Intelligence, Blog, Entrepreneurship, Marketing for Peace Builders, Mediation, Networking, New Posts, Opinions, Relationships, Selling for Peace Builders, Storytelling

If you want more people to resolve more conflicts, your training organization, your mediation practice, or even your content and marketing around peacebuilding, must acknowledge the current state of consumer behavior.

When the reality set before you, is that you would prefer to shop on Amazon, date online, order food from a service that you can turn in to a pre-made meal, and watch whatever you want on-demand whenever you want it, you have to expect that the people in conflict you seek to serve are interacting with the market in the same ways.

This is market and consumer-based empathy.

You favor convenience, so do parties in conflict.

You favor speed to a solution with low friction, so do parties in conflict.

You favor paying attention to what you like and ignoring what you don’t, so do parties in conflict.

You favor the appearance of having access to multiple options, but only accepting one or two, so do parties in conflict.

This is market and consumer-based empathy.

If you examine your own consumer behavior in the market of ideas, products, and services, and still can’t find a way to change your training and mediation marketing to match consumer reality…

…then the reality is, you might have an empathy problem in your marketing.

Rejection Without Shame

By | Active Listening, Blog, Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Networking, New Posts, Opinions, Organizational Development, Persuasion, Platform Building, Selling for Peace Builders, Storytelling

Rejection comes in a litany of flavors:

“We don’t have any conflicts here.”

“We deal with conflicts really well here.”

“We don’t really need your services right now, but if we do, we’ll give you a call.”

“[silence]. Who are you again?”

“How do you say your name?”

“I don’t understand how anybody can make money from doing what you do.”

“How do you monetize that?”

“Yeah, your rates are too high.”

“Yeah, your rates are too low.”

“I don’t understand what you are selling.”

“Why can’t you help me NOW?”

“Where did you get your degree again?”

“How do you make it here in this town?”

“Where are you from again?”

“Hmmmm. Ok. That sounds kind of interesting.” [Then wander off to get bread at the networking event ‘nosh’ table.]

“Have you tried working for a human resource company?”

“Have you tried working with [insert name of big company here]?”

“I don’t understand what you just said that you do.”

“There aren’t any people around here doing that are there?”

“Could you not charge me as much?”

“We’re strapped for cash right now and not really focused on retaining outside help right now.”

“Your rates are too high; you’ll never make a profit around here.”

“We are a family company. There aren’t any conflicts among family.”

“I handle conflict really well; I don’t see how I would use your services.”

“Have you tried working with lawyers around here?”

“We can’t pay you.”

“We’ll get back to you.”

“We can’t pay you.”

“Can you do this for free for us?”

“We can’t pay you.”

“Send us your information and we’ll look at it.” >click<

“I just don’t have time to talk to you, call back next week.” [Call back again next week]

“I just don’t have time to talk to you, call back next week.” >click<

“That sounds interesting, but I don’t want you to drive all the way to [name location 25 miles in any direction from locally] to meet me. It would just be a waste of your time.”

“You’ll never make a living doing that. You should get a ‘real’ job.”

“You went to college for CONFLICT!?”

“Why don’t you just volunteer?”

Very rarely have we ever heard “No,” “No thank you,” or “No this isn’t for us.”

Although ultimately, the fact is that all the forms of rejection really come down to such a consideration. All the forms of rejection can be given without personally attacking, trolling, tearing down individuals’ talent, and questioning people’s motives. But when rejection crosses the line from “No this isn’t for us” to “You don’t deserve to have a voice,” or “You need to be denied the ability to speak because I disagree with you,” then we’ve crossed over the line into another area.

And we must be careful with what lines we cross because sometimes, there is no going back.

Human to Business Sales

By | Emotional Intelligence, Active Listening, Advice, Blog, Consulting, Entrepreneurship, New Posts, Relationships, Selling for Peace Builders, Workplace, Workshop

Selling to people in businesses is hard for three important reasons:

  1. There are very few (or no) champions of your product or service offering because no one knows how good your product or service offering is inside the organization you’re selling to.
  2. There are no direct ways to influence the people who can make the decision to buy from you—today.
  3. There has been a massive shift in consumer behavior, but not a massive shift how businesses purchase from you based in the reality of shifting consumer behavior.

These are big problems and they’re getting bigger because the practice of creating buyer personas still dominates in a big way in almost every piece of advice available around advising organizations on how to sell to organizations.

While buyer personas are a fine shorthand for figuring out the profile in your head as a seller to businesses, the downfall of them is that they neglect each of the three areas above. In addition, they depersonalize the act of buying (or purchasing or procurement) and attempt to reduce it to a series of formulaic and discreet steps.

Which, of course, makes the three reasons above more problematic, not less.

Here are three ideas that may help when you’re selling (peace, consulting, freelance solutions, or even you’re next “gee-whiz” product to a skeptical procurement buyer):

Champions are easy to get (and even easier to lose), but require engaging with personality, care, and empathy.

Most of the people who are going to become your champions are the ones who have the power to say “no” but no power to say “yes.”

There are still gatekeepers in many organizations, and going where they are (in-person, online, emotionally, rationally, etc.) will go a long way toward engaging with them.

You must determine if buying today is all that matters, or if arbitraging the time to build a relationship today against the dollars that you are going to get tomorrow, matters more in the long run.

The short run will take care of itself.

Does your selling strategy include a 1,000-year long plan?

The reality of consumer behavior means that buyer personas are dead as predictors of selling success in the B2B space.

It also means that running after every social platform for sales is also dead.

This is a good thing.

In principle, this means that consumer behavior in business to business sales is the same behavior in business to consumer sales, but the volume of the connection is lower.

In practice, this means that targeted videos on a YouTube channel, embedded in an email campaign, direct to a buyer, matter more than the number of Facebook likes you happen to be cultivating that aren’t converting to sales.

In practice, this also means that providing value to the small number of businesses you work with as a selling organization, trumps the number of actual businesses that you work with.

Or that you think you should work with.

Champions, behavior, targeted engagement, and long-term strategy matter more for business success than just closing the sale and moving on to the next client.

[Podcast] Earbud_U, Season Four, Episode # 10 – David J. Smith

By | Blog, Earbud_U Podcast, Earbud_U!, Education, Entrepreneurship, Marketing for Peace Builders, Mediation, Negotiation, Old Posts, Platform Building, Podcast Archives, Podcast Episode, Selling for Peace Builders, Storytelling, The Future & The Singularity

[Podcast] Earbud_U, Season Four, Episode # 10 – David J. Smith, Peace Builder, Consultant, Speaker, Educator and Author

[Podcast] Earbud_U, Season Four, Episode #10 – David J. Smith

Some things, ideas, and even spaces are hiding in plain sight. Like the idea of walking in peace. Or building a career in helping people walk in peace.

The big question is (to paraphrase from the film The Prestige): Are you paying any attention?

Our guest today, David J. Smith is the author of many books on teaching peace. He most recently wrote the book Peace Jobs: A Student’s Guide to Starting a Career Working for Peace.

And he has come on at no better time than now, to talk about what really matters.

Look, I asked a podcast guest recently, “Why aren’t peacebuilders paid more?” and she gave that question an honest and thought provoking answer which you’ll have the pleasure of hearing next season.

I assert that the reason peacebuilder’s struggle to get appropriate compensation for the emotionally draining work that they do, is because we live in a conflict comfortable and peace skeptical society and culture.

David answers the question in another way on the podcast today.


Look, this is the last episode of our penultimate 4th season of the podcast, and I for one, could not be more grateful and appreciative of your ears, your attention and your focus this year.

Your feedback, as always, has been tremendous for a podcast that runs no advertising other than mine, and where I don’t come on the mike and ask you to donate to my Patreon page, or to rank me in ITunes, Stitcher or on Google Play.

Though the Earbud_U Podcast is available for download and rating on all those platforms.

Thank you for all your support in this self-funded effort, and we’ll be back in January 2017 with a new year, a new slate of guests, and even a new opening I’ve been working on.


Connect with David J. Smith in all the ways you can below:

Website: https://davidjsmithconsulting.com/

Peace Jobs Book Link: http://www.infoagepub.com/products/Peace-Jobs

Facebook (For Peace Jobs): https://www.facebook.com/PeaceJobs1/

Facebook (to Connect with David): https://www.facebook.com/david.j.smith.54584

Twitter: https://twitter.com/davidjsmith2013